Racism: Holding and Rainford-Brent do some plain speaking

Michael Anthony Holding, one of the feared West Indies pace bowlers from the 1970s and 1980s, bowled his best spell on 10 July, in front of the TV cameras.

Holding, in England to commentate on the Test series between England and the West Indies, took part in a roundtable on the Black Lives Matter protests which have been sweeping the world recently after an African-American man, George Floyd, was killed by a police officer in Minneapolis on May 25.

Holding speaks frankly, Very frankly. Along with former England cricketer Ebony Rainford-Brent, he spoke about the issues he had faced as a black man, the problems in cricket and how they could be resolved.

There was no bitterness in his voice, just audible pain and sadness. At one point, he came close to breaking down and later told one of the hosts that the memory of his mother being ostracised by her own family because she had married a very dark man had led to this.

Holding spoke of the need for education, to wipe out the centuries of conditioning that have resulted in black people knowing that white lives matter, while white people do not really care about black lives. He cited studies from American universities like Yale to make his points.

And much as white people will dismiss whatever he says, one could not escape the fact that here was a 66-year-old who had seen it all and some calling for a sane solution to the ills of racism.

He provided examples of racism from each of England, South Africa and Australia. In England, he cited the case when he was trying to flag down a cab while going home with his wife-to-be – a woman of Portuguese ancestry who is white. The driver had his meter up to indicate his cab was not occupied, but then on seeing Holding quickly offed the meter light and drove on. An Englishman of West Indian descent who recognised Holding, called out to him, “Hey Mikey, you have to put her in front.” To which Holding, characteristically, replied, “I would rather walk.”

In Australia, he cited a case during a tour; the West Indies teams were always put on a single floor in any hotel they stayed in. Holding said he and three of his fast bowling colleagues were coming down in a lift when it stopped at a floor on the way down. “There was a man waiting there,” Holding said. “He looked at us and did not get into the lift. That’s fine, maybe he was intimidated by the presence of four, big black men.

“But then, just before the lift doors closed, he shouted a racial eipthet at us.

And in South Africa, Holding cited a case when he and his Portuguese friend had gone to a hotel to stay. Someone came to him and was getting the details to book him in; meanwhile some other hotel staffer went to his companion and tried to book her in. “To their way of thinking, she could not possibly be with me, because she was white,” was Holding’s comment. “After all, I am black, am I not?”

Rainford-Brent, who took part in a formal video with Holding, also ventilated the problems that black women cricketers faced in England and spoke with tremendous feeling about the lack of people of colour at any level of the sport.

She was in tears occasionally as she spoke, as frankly as Holding, but again with no bitterness of the travails black people have when they join up to play cricket.

One only hopes that the talk does not end there and something is done about equality. Sky Sports, the broadcaster which ran this remarkable and unusual discussion, has pledged put 30 million pounds into efforts to narrow the gap. Holding’s view was that if enough big companies got involved then the gap would close that much faster.

If he has hope after what he has endured, then there is no reason why the rest of us should not.

The worst airport in the world? Easy, it’s Los Angeles

The worst airport in the world is in Los Angeles. This is the opinion of one who has passed through airports in Mumbai, Chennai, Bengaluru, Dallas, Orlando, Washington DC, Singapore, Bangkok, Frankfurt, Berlin, Hamburg, Cancun, Colombo, Dubai and London (Heathrow and Gatwick).

I have passed through LA in 2013, 2014 and 2016. Why does LA qualify as the worst? The buildings and facilities are alright but the staff are both incredibly inefficient and rude. They do not seem to give a damn about doing their jobs – which is to ensure that passengers get through the airport as fast as possible and catch their connecting flights or leave for their homes.

It is common to find airport staff — and there are legions of them — lounging around while crowds of passengers try desperately to get through the maze-like rigmarole that passes for immigration. There is no thought given to the fact that there may be passengers who have little time to catch a connection – anyone who wants to seek assistance has to go searching for some majordomo who is in charge, some tinpot dictator who is located at a considerable distance away from the milling crowd.
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Serena Williams has lost and we should all rejoice

When Serena Williams loses, we should all rejoice. And more so when the loss comes as she is heading for a major achievement.

Serena is so wrapped up in herself that she was describing the calendar Grand Slam which she was trying to achieve as a “Serena Slam”. Can anyone be more egotistical?

Thankfully for all humanity, an Italian player by the name of Flavia Pennetta got in the way of Serena’s ambitions and dumped her from the US Open.
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Abbott ratchets up the fear factor to boost poll standings

When a prime minister has discovered that only one tactic — ratcheting up the fear factor — helps to boost his poll numbers, and his poll standing is desperately low, what does he do?

Tony Abbott has made a profession of demonising asylum-seekers and Muslims and pretending that the world faces an existential threat from the terrorist Islamic State group.

In recent times Abbott has gone back to similar tactics. First, he engineered a “request” from the US, for Australia to join in air strikes on Syria.
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Australia still feels guilty about stealing the country from the Aborigines

More than 200 years after white people stole the Australian continent from its Aboriginal owners, they still feel threatened when there is a public display of black culture.

Nothing else can account for the reaction of people after Aboriginal Australian Rules footballer Adam Goodes broke out into a war dance after kicking a goal last Friday.

The dance came during one of the games in the so-called Indigenous Round, when the Australian Football League celebrates the contribution that Indigenous players have made to the game.
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Death of a teenager: why were police not asked obvious questions?

THERE are obvious questions which should have been put to the police in the wake of the shooting of Numan Haider, an 18-year-old Muslim man, in the Melbourne suburb of Endeavour Hills on Tuesday (September 23) night.

But it’s doubtful that any reporter from the mainstream media — which appears to function more as a propaganda arm of the government — will ask these queries.

Why did police ask a person whom they acknowledge was under surveillance to come in for an interview at night, and alone?
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Mandela is dead – as was the Freedom Charter

NELSON Mandela died today. There is much emotion about the place, in countries around the globe, as many regarded him as the freedom fighter’s freedom fighter.

The public tale about him is one of a man who fought to bring equality to a country which had, as its official policy, the doctrine that white was superior to black.

That much is true. But that is only part of the story.
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Suffer little children: Scott Morrison is an expert

But Jesus said, Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven. – Gospel of St Matthew, Chapter 19, verse 14

NO DOUBT, this morning, two practising Christians will attend their respective churches and worship their God.

Tony Abbott, the prime minister of Australia, is a committed Catholic. Scott Morrison, his immigration minister, goes one step further – he is a committed Pentecostal born-again Christian.

Or so the pair claim.
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Australia: Muslims not welcome here

THE brilliant American comedian Dave Chappelle often refers to himself as a connoisseur of racism. A keen observer of the way in which people of colour are discriminated against in the US, Chappelle is quick to use his observations in his stand-up routines.

He would certainly find plenty of material in Australia. The rich vein of racism that flows through the country is for the most part unnoticed. It is considered normal, a part of everyday life. But from time to time, we are reassured that when it comes to racism, Australia is in the front ranks.

A day back, Australia’s first Muslim member of federal parliament, Ed Husic, was promoted to the front bench. He, naturally, took his oath of office on the book of his faith, the Quran. Only a rank idiot would expect him to swear on the Bible, or the Gita or the Torah, given that these texts have no significance to him.
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In Australia, justice can be black and white

IN February 2010, Andrew Lovett, an Australian rules football player, was charged with one count of rape over an incident in December 2009.

Lovett had been recruited by St Kilda that year after spending six years with, and playing 88 games for, the Essendon football club.

St Kilda immediately sacked Lovett. He never got back to playing in the senior league again, even though he was acquitted of the charge in July 2011.

Lovett is Aboriginal.
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