Category Archives: Rugby League

A man who gets a blowjob lacks integrity. The NRL thinks so

A rugby league player is driving along with a woman when they both get a bit randy and the girl sucks him off. Both are adults; the man is 22, the woman 39.

The man films a small portion of the process (else he has to be the world’s fastest ejaculator) as a lark, with the woman in full agreement. Months later the clip is sent by the man to someone via SnapChat; that someone (who remains unknown) apparently puts it on social media.

The video itself runs for all of 10 seconds. It shows the man’s face and the back of the woman’s head. If anyone is titillated by it, then they’d have to be a real weirdo.

The man is Konrad Hurrell of the New Zealand Warriors, the woman is Teuila Blakey, a New Zealand TV actress. Neither of them is embarrassed about the video.

And in truth, they have no reason to be – they did not break the laws of public obscenity, they are both well above the age of consent, neither of them was forced into the act. What they choose to do to get their rocks off is their own business. Or so one would think.

But the moral guardians of society don’t think so.

The episode apparently is an embarrassment to the league authorities because it comes at the start of the Women In League round of home and away matches. Really?

One would think that this would be considered a good example of women not being afraid to do what pleases them sexually. Why is it embarrassing?

Some league official says it could be embarrassing to corporate sponsors. Why? Are these people unfamiliar with fellatio and cunnilingus?

One doubts very much that Hurrell has a clause in his contract that forbids him from indulging in oral sex. Then wherein lies the problem?

The National Rugby League’s integrity unit is said to be investigating! Now that’s a hoot. Was there some lack of integrity in the blowjob in question? If one thinks that a person being fellated raises questions of integrity, there are a lot of people in public life who would have to retire to an ashram.

The problem lies with the people who think that the moment a man participates in sport, he becomes a role model. Nothing could be further from the truth. And the sooner these moral guardians of society realise that their morbid interest in this kind of incident points to the fact that they have rather mundane lives themselves, the better.